Electric vehicle owners need to provide better infrastructure

Some Flatlander readers say the provincial governments should invest more in EV infrastructure; others disagree.

A lot of Flatlander readers wrote in to share their thoughts on electric vehicles (EVs) after last week’s article

Some readers are interested in buying them, and others are less so because they are wary of the technology.

Tim wrote: “I am curious . . . as to why this topic has been chosen?” 

The reason The Flatlander chose to look at EVs is that it seemed like a natural next step to follow our first big journalism feature on lithium mining, as both Saskatchewan and Manitoba hope to benefit economically from this resource, which is needed for EV batteries. 

The demand for EVs is expected to grow significantly over the next 10 to 30 years, especially as governments like Canada start to nudge people in that direction with financial incentives.

But even without government intervention, the horse has left the barn when it comes to EVs. 

EVs are gaining popularity. The sale of EVs increased by 2.7 per cent over the spring of 2021 to 2022. In the second quarter of 2022, EV sales accounted for 5.6 per cent of the total auto market.

Some of the reasons EV sales are growing are because although EVs are expensive to buy, they are cheaper to maintain

Also, the charging infrastructure is expanding, even though the local EV drivers we talked to say it could be much better. They also say the available infrastructure has grown significantly over the past four or five years. 

Some Flatlander readers say the provincial governments should invest more in EV infrastructure; others say tax money shouldn’t be invested in charging stations. Regardless of how you feel as a reader, it’s still worth knowing what the provincial governments are doing.

Manitoba Hydro and SaskPower are working to improve the power grids to accommodate EVs. 

As of Mar. 31, 2022, there were 1,288 EVs registered in Manitoba, according to Manitoba Hydro’s Market Forecast & Load Research March 2022 report.I have about half a dozen reader questions and comments on EVs that I will address in next week’s issue.

In the meantime, here is the second and final half of The Flatlander’s look at EVs.

Instead of breaking the article into parts, as I did with the lithium article, I’ve made the whole article available online all at once. 

Local, independent, in-depth.

Our Prairie stories.

You can read the full article here.

If you are just interested in Manitoba or Saskatchewan, you can click on the links below to jump to the part of the article about your province.

Getty Images.

Five stories from Manitoba you may have missed

  1. Can natural infrastructure help revitalize Winnipeg’s downtown?
  2. Remote work camps linked to violence against Indigenous women: report
  3. City of Winnipeg lost over $400K on weeks-long Brady Road landfill closure
  4. Man charged in string of small-town bank robberies in southern Manitoba
  5. Winnipeg looks at severing ties with sister city in China over human rights concerns

Five stories from Saskatchewan you may have missed

Keep up to date with The Flatlander. Subscribe to our newsletter.

  1. Maidstone RCMP warn of catfishing scams targeting young men, teenage boys in Sask.
  2. Sask. veterinary association says staff shortages at ‘crisis point amid high demand
  3. SaskPower projects major shortfall this year, largest in decades
  4. Here’s how Star Blanket Cree Nation plans to investigate 2,000 ground anomalies near former residential school
  5. More freedom for Saskatchewan farmers to fix their own equipment on the horizon

Important work at a critical time.

Over the last 20 years, on the Prairies and beyond,  local newsrooms have shrunk, which means not much investigative journalism gets done in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The Flatlander is changing this.

 

Will you support our work today?

 

Author

Subscribe to The Flatlander

Important stories from Manitoba and Saskatchewan delivered to your inbox every week. 

Thanks for signing up!

You'll hear from us soon. You can unsubscribe from the newsletter at any time.

This site uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. By continuing to use this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with our privacy policy.